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Mobility

As technology progresses, so too do our options to get around. From public transit to autonomous vehicles, U-M experts are on the cutting edge in both catalyzing new transportation modes and in analyzing their impact and relation to broader sustainability. Key initiatives like Mcity and the Center for Sustainable Systems study the nexus between technological advancements, climate change, and related socioeconomic disparities and opportunities.

News and Impact

Robert Hampshire
‘Transportation is a form of freedom’: How to make it more equitable
diagram demonstrating the different analysis areas of the president's commission on carbon neutrality
U-M carbon neutrality commission submits final recommendations
The atrium of the Ford Robotics Building at the University of Michigan. Photo: Ford Motor Company
U-M, Ford open world-class robotics complex
Barry Rabe
Rabe comments on GM's historic move to electric vehicles
Mcity
U-M licenses Mcity’s automated-vehicle testing software
Current circular economy framework for automobiles. Reproduced with permission from the article published by the Journal of Industrial Ecology.
A Circular Economy Framework for Automobiles
File folders labeled "grants," "funding" and "projects"
U-M’s Advanced Transportation Hub announces funding to 8 promising mobility projects
Analysis of a single vehicle trip occurring from 21:46–22:26 on August 11, 2014. The top two panels show video footage during the rainy (left) and dry (right) segments of the trip. The bottom left panel shows a map of the vehicle’s trip, with the wiper intensity indicated by color. A radar overlay shows the average rainfall intensity over the 40-minute time period. Blue circles represent the gages nearest to the vehicle path. The two bottom right panels show the precipitation intensity as estimated by radar and gage measurements (center), and the 1-minute average wiper intensity (bottom). Image courtesy: Scientific Reports
How connected vehicles’ windshield wipers could help prevent flooding
A traffic light with the yellow light on
Connected cars can lie, posing a new threat to smart cities